Zoë’s 2023 Academy Awards Predictions – November 18th

Twitter could be going down any day now, but that doesn’t mean my Friday Oscar prediction updates will be stopping any time soon. No matter what happens, you can always count on me to keep regularly reporting on this awards season here on We Live Entertainment (and you can follow me elsewhere on essentially every other social media platform @zoerosebryant to keep up on everything else I’m up to), and I hope today’s piece can help give you a reprieve from doomscrolling during Twitter’s downfall as this is the “Big Babylon Update™.”

Now, full disclosure, I haven’t seen Babylon for myself yet (and I’ll be sure to do a full write-up of my thoughts on its awards chances when I do), so these updates will be based primarily off of both the divisive reactions to Babylon‘s Monday LA screening and the slightly more mixed-positive reactions from its NY screenings two days later. And even still, when perusing through almost every early Babylon reaction that’s been shared on the Internet, there’s no way we can possibly come to a clear conclusion on how it’ll fare with Academy voters just yet. I did cover the LA screening reactions more in-depth this Tuesday – where I also argued that this division could result in pockets of passion that ultimately do elevate the film in this year’s awards race, as was the case for past divisive Oscar contenders like The Wolf of Wall Street – but now that the NY takes have trickled in as well, we’re able to get a broader read on what we’re really dealing with here.

Margot Robbie in Babylon

To keep it short and simple, I still think Babylon is a Best Picture contender, and there are two reasons for that. First, as I mentioned above, division means that, while some viewers may walk away detesting the film’s chaotic opulence and graphic content, others will adore it for those very same reasons and find themselves personally invested in pushing it for top prizes because they’re so mystified by how much “movie” it is. Sure, division means it’s probably dead on the preferential ballot – this is likely no longer a threat to win Best Picture – but strong reactions one way or the other are exactly what you need to nab a nomination. Second, the film may just be “Too Big To Fail™.” Yeah, Paramount probably doesn’t even need Babylon to be a big Oscar contender now that Top Gun has surprisingly taken up that mantle for them, but there’s no way in hell they’re not going to still throw all their weight behind the latest film from Oscar-winning writer/director Damien Chazelle (a classic Hollywood epic, no less), starring Oscar winner Brad Pitt and Oscar nominee Margot Robbie, shot by Oscar winner Linus Sandgren, edited by Oscar winner Tom Cross, scored by Oscar winner Justin Hurwitz, and so on and so forth.

Pretty much everyone in the industry is going to watch Babylon solely due to all of the talent attached for it, so you’d be a fool to write it off entirely. Divisive or not, there’s no way this isn’t going to land somewhere, as it comes equipped with the cushion of its cast’s and crew’s appeal in The Academy. Think of movies like Adam McKay’s Vice or David Fincher’s Mank, two films that were pegged as major Oscar contenders months before anyone had seen them, only to be met with mixed-ish reviews when they were finally released, but since they had so many industry favorites attached to them (and since pundits had been “saving” spaces for them in the race all season), they still went on to earn eight and ten Oscar nominations, respectively – and Mank was even the nomination leader of its year. Obviously, this discussion will evolve when we finally get to read full-length reviews for Babylon and see what its Rotten Tomatoes and Metacritic scores look like, but don’t let this mirage of division (and I use “mirage” purposely, as when you actually do some digging, you’ll see that Babylon reactions are nowhere near as “abysmal” as click-bait headlines would lead you to believe) sway you away from the fact that it’s bound to get some sort of a boost from the industry prioritizing these Big Names™.

Margot Robbie and Diego Calva in Babylon

But beyond Best Picture, what nominations are the likeliest for Babylon? Let’s start with the craft categories. I think Best Costume Design, Best Production Design, and Best Original Score should be slam-dunk noms, partially because those are also the awards I’m predicting Babylon to win at the moment – there are simply no real frontrunners in those categories right now, and even those that didn’t care for Babylon walked away from it praising the techs (and these in particular, especially when it came to Justin Hurwitz’s jubilantly jazzy score), so I’m not too worried about it breaking into these three line-ups. Best Cinematography is probably the next best bet, as while I don’t have it winning (watch out for Avatar: The Way of Water, especially if its a Best Picture nominee and our Best Visual Effects winner – a tough stat to topple), this is a scopious and sumptuously shot film that should strongly appeal to the cinematographers branch, and Sandgren is a previous winner. Best Film Editing and Best Makeup and Hairstyling are also up for grabs, but those branches are a bit more finicky – if your film is lagging in the race or lacking widespread passion, it’s easy for it to be “shockingly” snubbed by the editors (RomaOnce Upon a Time in HollywoodMank, etc.), and the makeup artists and hairstylists overlook some “obvious” contenders every year, so nothing is a sure thing there until it’s a nominee. I’ll include Babylon in my predicted line-ups for now, at least until these categories became a bit clearer, as the work is undeniably impressive (and Oscar-worthy) by all accounts – especially Tom Cross’ expeditious editing.

What of the actors? Well, another thing that almost all of these Babylon reactions have in common is praise for Margot Robbie’s powerhouse performance in the film. Some felt that she was “failed by the script,” but even despite the screenplay’s stumbles (and since we’re here, I’ll just say that all the complaints about the story’s scattered or scrambled writing will probably keep the film out of that category), Robbie seems to rise above, and it’s been apparent for awhile from the trailers and TV spots alone that she’d be going for broke with this bravura portrayal of a 1920s starlet that burned bright and burnt out, and I expect her fellow actors to applaud her for this theatrical chutzpah. Babylon‘s division will likely keep her away from the winning conversation – I expect that to still center around Michelle Yeoh, Cate Blanchett, and Michelle Williams – but she should neverthless be an easy nod for the film as a two-time former nominee turning in supremely showy work. Who will join her? Well, we haven’t heard too much on Brad Pitt, though those who do mention him seem to have praise for his performance as well, and I suspect much of the silence around his part in the project could be stemming from his recent PR problems involving the abuse allegations from ex-wife Angelina Jolie. It remains to be seen how much that will weigh on Pitt’s awards campaign with the industry, but for now, journalists and pundits don’t seem to be biting. I’ve shuffled my Best Supporting Actor predictions accordingly, but that race remains in flux, and I could still see Pitt make it in with a few precursors, even if he does end up stumbling at the finish line (as he’s another Big Name™ doing Big Work™).

Diego Calva in Babylon

However, another actor in the film is receiving as strong of notices as Robbie, and that’s lead Diego Calva, with many declaring this to be a “star-making turn” from him. Some disagree – Variety‘s Clayton Davis said that he “isn’t given much to do beyond being relegated to ‘guy staring from the corner’ for most of the three-hour epic” – but the broader consensus is that he’s one hell of a find, and if Babylon does do as well as it possibly can this awards season, it’s easy to see him swept along for the ride as the “face” of the film, especially since the Best Actor field is so empty this year. Could he be another John David Washington? An actor in their First Major Movie Role™ who gets nods at a few precursors (such as the Golden Globes, Critics Choice, and/or SAG) but comes up short at the Oscars in favor of a more well-known name? Perhaps. But maybe the weak field cancels out Calva’s lack of name recognition, especially since the Big Names™ who could replace him like Top Gun: Maverick‘s Tom Cruise or The Son‘s Hugh Jackman are starring in films that don’t typically produce acting nominees (in the former’s case) or have been poorly received (in the latter’s). Calva’s no lock, but he has good enough notices – and enough of a path through the precursors – to give me some hope for him right now, even though predicting a line-up of all first-time nominees does make me feel a little uneasy.

And what of Damien Chazelle himself, the madman behind all of this bawdy bombast? Well, I’ve already told you what I think about his Best Original Screenplay chances (“Not great, Bob!”), but I still believe him to be a strong contender for a Best Director nod, particularly because this kind of vast, vibrant vision is exactly what that notoriously “artsy” branch aims to honor. Plus, their Oscar nods are some of the most influenced by their own pure passion for a contender and his or her work, regardless of how their film fares elsewhere in The Academy – all three of the aforementioned “divisive” awards contenders I’ve compared Babylon to (The Wolf of Wall Street, Vice, and Mank) received Best Director nods, even when some pundits started to count them out, and it helps that, like Martin Scorsese, Adam McKay, and David Fincher, Chazelle is a known and respected name (and a former winner to boot, like Scorsese). I have moved him down a bit, as I do worry he could find himself on the outside looking in if Babylon experiences a downwards trajectory this season and alienates more awards voters as the months go on, but I’m not ready to remove him entirely, even if I do no longer think he’s “win competitive” (and ironically, tallying all these nods up, I have Babylon matching fellow divisive old Hollywood epic Mank with 10 nominations when all is said and done).

Joyland

Other odds and ends this week:

  • Although Pakistan banned Saim Sadiq’s Joyland – their entry for this year’s Best International Feature race – for containing “highly objectionable” material (as the film centers around a male background dancer who falls in love with the trans woman he’s working for), the film can still qualify for the Oscars, since the film’s awards strategists plan to give the film its required seven-day theatrical run in France instead, by November 30 (which is the qualifying release date cutoff for the International Feature category). Funnily enough, Pakistan’s prejudiced ban against the film has actually elevated its profile immensely, as what was once a relative longshot for a nomination now becomes one of the hottest titles in contention. I haven’t put it in my final five yet, but it is my alternate now due to all the publicity surrounding it, which is sure to attract the attention of Academy voters.
  • Amazon Studios’ Good Night Oppy straight-up swept this year’s Critics Choice Documentary Awards, winning five of the six awards it was nominated for, including Best Documentary Feature (the other four were Best Director, Best Science/Nature Documentary, Best Narration, and Best Score). Does this mean Oscar glory is ahead too? It could be too soon to say, as this group has only given their top prize to the eventual Oscar winner once in their six years of existence (last year, with Summer of Soul), but I do think I’ve been underestimating Oppy for too long. It’s an immensely crowdpleasing doc about the the story of Opportunity, a Mars rover launched in 2003 that was originally expected to operate for only 90 sols but ended up exploring Mars for nearly 15 years, and its heartwarming and accessible themes could make it a contender in the vein of 2020’s My Octopus Teacher (Next Best Picture’s Will Mavity even amusingly nicknamed it “My Oppy-pus Teacher”).

BEST PICTURE

Michelle Yeoh in Everything Everywhere All at Once

1. Everything Everywhere All at Once (A24)

2. The Fabelmans (Universal Pictures)

3. The Banshees of Inisherin (Searchlight Pictures)

4. Women Talking (UAR/Orion)

5. Babylon (Paramount Pictures)

6. Top Gun: Maverick (Paramount Pictures) (+1)

7. TÁR (Focus Features) (-1)

8. The Whale (A24)

9. Avatar: The Way of Water (20th Century Studios)

10. She Said (Universal Pictures)

ALTERNATES:

11. Guillermo del Toro’s Pinocchio (Netflix)

12. Triangle of Sadness (NEON)

13. Aftersun (A24)

14. Glass Onion: A Knives Out Mystery (Netflix) (+2)

15. Elvis (Warner Bros.)

16. Decision to Leave (MUBI) (+1)

17. Empire of Light (Searchlight Pictures) (+1)

18. The Woman King (Sony Pictures Releasing) (-4)

19. All Quiet on the Western Front (Netflix)

20. Black Panther: Wakanda Forever (Walt Disney/Marvel Studios)


BEST DIRECTOR

Steven Spielberg at the 2022 Toronto International Film Festival

1. Steven Spielberg – The Fabelmans (Universal Pictures)

2. Daniel Kwan and Daniel Scheinert – Everything Everywhere All at Once (A24)

3. Todd Field – TÁR (Focus Features)

4. Sarah Polley – Women Talking (UAR/Orion)

5. Damien Chazelle – Babylon (Paramount Pictures) (-3)

ALTERNATES:

6. Park Chan-wook – Decision to Leave (MUBI)

7. Martin McDonagh – The Banshees of Inisherin (Searchlight Pictures)

8. James Cameron – Avatar: The Way of Water (20th Century Studios)

9. Alejandro González Iñárritu – BARDO, False Chronicle of a Handful of Truths (Netflix)

10. Ruben Östlund – Triangle of Sadness (NEON)


BEST ACTOR

Brendan Fraser in The Whale

1. Brendan Fraser – The Whale (A24)

2. Colin Farrell – The Banshees of Inisherin (Searchlight Pictures)

3. Austin Butler – Elvis (Warner Bros.)

4. Bill Nighy – Living (Sony Pictures Classics)

5. Diego Calva – Babylon (Paramount Pictures)

ALTERNATES:

6. Tom Cruise – Top Gun: Maverick (Paramount Pictures)

7. Paul Mescal – Aftersun (A24) (+1)

8. Hugh Jackman – The Son (Sony Pictures Classics) (-1)

9. Gabriel LaBelle – The Fabelmans (Universal Pictures)

10. Adam Sandler – Hustle (Netflix) (NEW)


BEST ACTRESS

Michelle Yeoh in Everything Everywhere All at Once

1. Michelle Yeoh – Everything Everywhere All at Once (A24)

2. Cate Blanchett – TÁR (Focus Features)

3. Michelle Williams – The Fabelmans (Universal Pictures)

4. Margot Robbie – Babylon (Paramount Pictures)

5. Danielle Deadwyler – Till (UAR/Orion)

ALTERNATES:

6. Olivia Colman – Empire of Light (Searchlight Pictures)

7. Naomi Ackie – I Wanna Dance with Somebody (Sony Pictures Releasing)

8. Viola Davis – The Woman King (Sony Pictures Releasing)

9. Emma Thompson – Good Luck to You, Leo Grande (Searchlight Pictures)

10. Jennifer Lawrence – Causeway (Apple TV+)


BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

Ke Huy Quan in Everything Everywhere All at Once

1. Ke Huy Quan – Everything Everywhere All at Once (A24)

2. Brendan Gleeson – The Banshees of Inisherin (Searchlight Pictures)

3. Paul Dano – The Fabelmans (Universal Pictures) (+2)

4. Judd Hirsch – The Fabelmans (Universal Pictures)

5. Barry Keoghan – The Banshees of Inisherin (Searchlight Pictures) (+1)

ALTERNATES:

6. Brad Pitt – Babylon (Paramount Pictures) (-3)

7. Ben Whishaw – Women Talking (UAR/Orion)

8. Micheal Ward – Empire of Light (Searchlight Pictures)

9. Brian Tyree Henry – Causeway (Apple TV+)

10. Jeremy Strong – Armageddon Time (Focus Features)


BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

Carey Mulligan in She Said

1. Carey Mulligan – She Said (Universal Pictures)

2. Jessie Buckley – Women Talking (UAR/Orion)

3. Hong Chau – The Whale (A24)

4. Kerry Condon – The Banshees of Inisherin (Searchlight Pictures)

5. Claire Foy – Women Talking (UAR/Orion)

ALTERNATES:

6. Nina Hoss – TÁR (Focus Features)

7. Dolly de Leon – Triangle of Sadness (NEON)

8. Jamie Lee Curtis – Everything Everywhere All at Once (A24)

9. Stephanie Hsu – Everything Everywhere All at Once (A24)

10. Janelle Monáe – Glass Onion: A Knives Out Mystery (Netflix)


BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY

Michelle Yeoh, Ke Huy Quan, and Stephanie Hsu in Everything Everywhere All at Once

1. Daniel Kwan and Daniel Scheinert – Everything Everywhere All at Once (A24)

2. Martin McDonagh – The Banshees of Inisherin (Searchlight Pictures)

3. Tony Kushner and Steven Spielberg – The Fabelmans (Universal Pictures)

4. Todd Field – TÁR (Focus Features)

5. Ruben Östlund – Triangle of Sadness (NEON)

ALTERNATES:

6. Damien Chazelle – Babylon (Paramount Pictures)

7. Charlotte Wells – Aftersun (A24)

8. Jeong Seo-kyeong and Park Chan-wook – Decision to Leave (MUBI)

9. James Gray – Armageddon Time (Focus Features)

10. Sam Mendes – Empire of Light (Searchlight Pictures)


BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY

The cast of Women Talking

1. Sarah Polley – Women Talking (UAR/Orion)

2. Rebecca Lenkiewicz – She Said (Universal Pictures)

3. Samuel D. Hunter – The Whale (A24)

4. Rian Johnson – Glass Onion: A Knives Out Mystery (Netflix)

5. Noah Baumbach – White Noise (Netflix)

ALTERNATES:

6. Guillermo del Toro, Patrick McHale, and Matthew Robbins – Guillermo del Toro’s Pinocchio (Netflix)

7. Ehren Kruger, Christopher McQuarrie, and Eric Warren Singer – Top Gun: Maverick (Paramount Pictures)

8. Kazuo Ishiguro – Living (Sony Pictures Classics)

9. Edward Berger, Lesley Patterson, and Ian Stokell – All Quiet on the Western Front (Netflix)

10. David Kajganich – Bones and All (MGM/UAR)


BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY

Avatar: The Way of Water

1. Russell Carpenter – Avatar: The Way of Water (20th Century Studios)

2. Linus Sandgren – Babylon (Paramount Pictures)

3. Janusz Kamiński – The Fabelmans (Universal Pictures)

4. Roger Deakins – Empire of Light (Searchlight Pictures)

5. Darius Khondji – BARDO, False Chronicle of a Handful of Truths (Netflix) (+1)

ALTERNATES:

6. James Friend – All Quiet on the Western Front (Netflix) (-1)

7. Greig Fraser – The Batman (Warner Bros.)

8. Claudio Miranda – Top Gun: Maverick (Paramount Pictures)

9. Ben Davis – The Banshees of Inisherin (Searchlight Pictures)

10. Autumn Durald Arkapaw – Black Panther: Wakanda Forever (Walt Disney/Marvel Studios)


BEST COSTUME DESIGN

Diego Calva and Jean Smart in Babylon

1. Mary Zophres – Babylon (Paramount Pictures)

2. Catherine Martin – Elvis (Warner Bros.)

3. Ruth E. Carter – Black Panther: Wakanda Forever (Walt Disney/Marvel Studios)

4. Mark Bridges – The Fabelmans (Universal Pictures)

5. Gersha Phillips – The Woman King (Sony Pictures Releasing)

ALTERNATES:

6. Jenny Beavan – Mrs. Harris Goes to Paris (Focus Features)

7. Shirley Kurata – Everything Everywhere All at Once (A24)

8. Sandy Powell – Living (Sony Pictures Classics)

9. Alexandra Byrne – Empire of Light (Searchlight Pictures)

10. Albert Wolsky – Amsterdam (20th Century Studios)


BEST FILM EDITING

Michelle Yeoh in Everything Everywhere All at Once

1. Paul Rogers – Everything Everywhere All at Once (A24)

2. Eddie Hamilton – Top Gun: Maverick (Paramount Pictures)

3. Tom Cross – Babylon (Paramount Pictures)

4. Sarah Broshar and Michael Kahn – The Fabelmans (Universal Pictures)

5. David Brenner, James Cameron, John Refoua, and Stephen E. Rivkin – Avatar: The Way of Water (20th Century Studios)

ALTERNATES:

6. Matt Villa and Jonathan Redmond – Elvis (Warner Bros.)

7. Sven Budelmann – All Quiet on the Western Front (Netflix)

8. Roslyn Kalloo – Women Talking (UAR/Orion)

9. Bob Ducsay – Glass Onion: A Knives Out Mystery (Netflix)

10. Mikkel E.G. Nielsen – The Banshees of Inisherin (Searchlight Pictures)


BEST MAKEUP/HAIRSTYLING

Brendan Fraser in The Whale

1. TBD – The Whale (A24)

2. Jason Baird, Mark Coulier, Louise Coulston, and Shane Thomas – Elvis (Warner Bros.)

3. Naomi Donne, Mike Marino, and Zoe Tahir – The Batman (Warner Bros.)

4. TBD – Black Panther: Wakanda Forever (Walt Disney/Marvel Studios)

5. TBD – Babylon (Paramount Pictures)

ALTERNATES:

6. TBD – All Quiet on the Western Front (Netflix)

7. TBD – Blonde (Netflix)

8. TBD – X (A24)

9. TBD – The Woman King (Sony Pictures Releasing)

10. TBD – Thor: Love and Thunder (Walt Disney/Marvel Studios)


BEST ORIGINAL SCORE

1. Justin Hurwitz – Babylon (Paramount Pictures)

2. Alexandre Desplat – Guillermo del Toro’s Pinocchio (Netflix)

3. Hildur Guðnadóttir – Women Talking (UAR/Orion)

4. John Williams – The Fabelmans (Universal Pictures)

5. Simon Franglen – Avatar: The Way of Water (20th Century Studios)

ALTERNATES:

6. Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross – Empire of Light (Searchlight Pictures)

7. Carter Burwell – The Banshees of Inisherin (Searchlight Pictures)

8. Michael Giacchino – The Batman (Warner Bros.)

9. Volker Bertelmann – All Quiet on the Western Front (Netflix)

10. Danny Elfman – White Noise (Netflix)


BEST ORIGINAL SONG

1. “Lift Me Up” – Black Panther: Wakanda Forever (Walt Disney/Marvel Studios)

2. “Hold My Hand” – Top Gun: Maverick (Paramount Pictures)

3. “Naatu Naatu” – RRR (Sarigama Cinemas)

4. “Ciao Papa” – Guillermo del Toro’s Pinocchio (Netflix)

5. “Applause” – Tell It Like a Woman (Samuel Goldwyn Films)

ALTERNATES:

6. “Song Chord” – Avatar: The Way of Water (20th Century Studios)

7. “Nobody Like U” – Turning Red (Walt Disney/Pixar Animation)

8. “New Body Rhumba” – White Noise (Netflix)

9. “This Is A Life” – Everything Everywhere All at Once (A24)

10. “Stand Up” – Till (UAR/Orion)


BEST PRODUCTION DESIGN

Margot Robbie and the cast of Babylon in Babylon

1. Florencia Martin (Production Design) and Anthony Carlino (Set Decoration) – Babylon (Paramount Pictures)

2. Dylan Cole and Ben Procter (Production Design) and Vanessa Cole (Set Decoration) – Avatar: The Way of Water (20th Century Studios)

3. Hannah Beachler (Production Design) and Lisa K. Sessions (Set Decoration) – Black Panther: Wakanda Forever (Walt Disney/Marvel Studios)

4. Rick Carter (Production Design) and Karen O’Hara (Set Decoration) – The Fabelmans (Universal Pictures)

5. Catherine Martin (Production Design) and Beverley Dunn (Set Decoration) – Elvis (Warner Bros.)

ALTERNATES:

6. TBD (Production Design) and TBD (Set Decoration) – Guillermo del Toro’s Pinocchio (Netflix)

7. Christian M. Goldbeck (Production Design) and Ernestine Hipper (Set Decoration) – All Quiet on the Western Front (Netflix)

8. Akin McKenzie (Production Design) and TBD (Set Decoration) – The Woman King (Sony Pictures Releasing)

9. Mark Tildesley (Production Design) and Patricia Cuccia (Set Decoration) – Empire of Light (Searchlight Pictures)

10. Rick Heinrichs (Production Design) and Elli Griff (Set Decoration) – Glass Onion: A Knives Out Mystery (Netflix)


BEST SOUND

Tom Cruise in Top Gun: Maverick

1. Chris Burdon, James H. Mather, Al Nelson, Mark Taylor, and Mark Weingarten – Top Gun: Maverick (Paramount Pictures)

2. TBD – All Quiet on the Western Front (Netflix)

3. TBD – Avatar: The Way of Water (20th Century Studios)

4. William Files, Douglas Murray, Andy Nelson, and Stuart Wilson – The Batman (Warner Bros.)

5. TBD – Everything Everywhere All at Once (A24) (+3)

ALTERNATES:

6. Michael Keller, David Lee, Andy Nelson, and Wayne Pashley – Elvis (Warner Bros.)

7. TBD – Babylon (Paramount Pictures) (-2)

8. Brian Chumney, Ronald Judkins, Andy Nelson, and Gary Rydstrom – The Fabelmans (Universal Pictures) (NEW)

9. Paul “Salty” Brincat, Chris Burdon, William Miller, Oliver Tarney, and Rachael Tate – Thirteen Lives (Amazon Studios/MGM) (+1)

10. TBD – Guillermo del Toro’s Pinocchio (Netflix) (-3)


BEST VISUAL EFFECTS

Sam Worthington as Jake Sully in Avatar: The Way of Water

1. TBD – Avatar: The Way of Water (20th Century Studios)

2. TBD – Everything Everywhere All at Once (A24)

3. Scott R. Fisher, Seth Hill, Bryan Litson, and Ryan Tudhope – Top Gun: Maverick (Paramount Pictures)

4. TBD – Guillermo del Toro’s Pinocchio (Netflix)

5. Russell Earl, Anders Langlands, Dan Lemmon, and Dominic Tuohy – The Batman (Warner Bros.)

ALTERNATES:

6. TBD – Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness (Walt Disney/Marvel Studios)

7. TBD – Black Panther: Wakanda Forever (Walt Disney/Marvel Studios)

8. Ivan Busquets, Marko Chulev, Abishek Nair, and Steven Nichols – Good Night Oppy (MGM/UAR) (NEW)

9. Scott R. Fisher, Guillaume Rocheron, Jeremy Robert, and Sreejith Venugopalan – Nope (Universal Pictures) (-1)

10. TBD – Thor: Love and Thunder (Walt Disney/Marvel Studios) (-1)


BEST ANIMATED FEATURE

Guillermo del Toro's Pinocchio

1. Guillermo del Toro’s Pinocchio (Netflix)

2. Turning Red (Walt Disney/Pixar Animation)

3. My Father’s Dragon (Netflix) (+1)

4. Strange World (Walt Disney/Walt Disney Animation) (-1)

5. The Bad Guys (Universal Pictures/DreamWorks Animation)

ALTERNATES:

6. Marcel the Shell with Shoes On (A24)

7. Puss in Boots: The Last Wish (Universal Pictures/DreamWorks Animation)

8. Lightyear (Walt Disney/Pixar Animation)

9. Wendell & Wild (Netflix)

10. Apollo 10 1/2: A Space Age Childhood (Netflix)


BEST DOCUMENTARY FEATURE

Good Night Oppy

1. Good Night Oppy (Amazon Studios) (+6)

2. Navalny (Warner Bros.) (-1)

3. Fire of Love (National Geographic Documentary Films/NEON) (-1)

4. All the Beauty and the Bloodshed (NEON) (-1)

5. Descendant (Netflix) (-1)

ALTERNATES:

6. Moonage Daydream (NEON) (-1)

7. Sr. (Netflix) (-1)

8. All that Breathes (Submarine Deluxe) (NEW)

9. The Territory (National Geographic Documentary Films)

10. Sidney (Apple TV+) (-1)


BEST INTERNATIONAL FEATURE FILM

Park Hae-il and Tang Wei in Decision to Leave

1. Decision to Leave (MUBI) – South Korea

2. All Quiet on the Western Front (Netflix) – Germany

3. BARDO, False Chronicle of a Handful of Truths (Netflix) – Mexico

4. Close (A24) – Belgium

5. Saint Omer (TBD) – France

ALTERNATES:

6. Joyland (Film Constellation) – Pakistan (NEW)

7. Klondike (TBD) – Ukraine (-1)

8. Holy Spider (Utopia) – Denmark (-1)

9. Argentina, 1985 (Amazon Studios) – Argentina (-1)

10. EO (TBD) – Poland (-1)


WIN/NOMINATION TALLIES

  • The Fabelmans (1 win/11 nominations)
    • Best Picture
    • Best Director
    • Best Actress
    • Best Supporting Actor
    • Best Supporting Actor
    • Best Original Screenplay
    • Best Cinematography
    • Best Costume Design
    • Best Film Editing
    • Best Original Score
    • Best Production Design
  • Babylon (3 wins/10 nominations)
    • Best Picture
    • Best Director
    • Best Actor
    • Best Actress
    • Best Cinematography
    • Best Costume Design
    • Best Film Editing
    • Best Makeup and Hairstyling
    • Best Original Score
    • Best Production Design
  • Everything Everywhere All at Once (5 wins/8 nominations)
    • Best Picture
    • Best Director
    • Best Actress
    • Best Supporting Actor
    • Best Original Screenplay
    • Best Film Editing
    • Best Sound
    • Best Visual Effects
  • Avatar: The Way of Water (2 wins/7 nominations)
    • Best Picture
    • Best Cinematography
    • Best Film Editing
    • Best Original Score
    • Best Production Design
    • Best Sound
    • Best Visual Effects
  • Women Talking (1 win/6 nominations)
    • Best Picture
    • Best Director
    • Best Supporting Actress
    • Best Supporting Actress
    • Best Adapted Screenplay
    • Best Original Score
  • The Banshees of Inisherin (0 wins/6 nominations)
    • Best Picture
    • Best Actor
    • Best Supporting Actor
    • Best Supporting Actor
    • Best Supporting Actress
    • Best Original Screenplay
  • Top Gun: Maverick (1 win/5 nominations)
    • Best Picture
    • Best Film Editing
    • Best Original Song
    • Best Sound
    • Best Visual Effects
  • The Whale (2 wins/5 nominations)
    • Best Picture
    • Best Actor
    • Best Supporting Actress
    • Best Adapted Screenplay
    • Best Makeup and Hairstyling
  • Guillermo del Toro’s Pinocchio (1 win/4 nominations)
    • Best Animated Feature
    • Best Original Score
    • Best Original Song
    • Best Visual Effects
  • Black Panther: Wakanda Forever (1 win/4 nominations)
    • Best Costume Design
    • Best Makeup and Hairstyling
    • Best Original Song
    • Best Production Design
  • TÁR (0 wins/4 nominations)
    • Best Picture
    • Best Director
    • Best Actress
    • Best Original Screenplay
  • Elvis (0 wins/4 nominations)
    • Best Actor
    • Best Costume Design
    • Best Makeup and Hairstyling
    • Best Production Design
  • She Said (1 win/3 nominations)
    • Best Picture
    • Best Supporting Actress
    • Best Adapted Screenplay
  • The Batman (0 wins/3 nominations)
    • Best Makeup and Hairstyling
    • Best Sound
    • Best Visual Effects
  • BARDO, False Chronicle of a Handful of Truths (0 wins/2 nominations)
    • Best Cinematography
    • Best International Feature Film
  • All Quiet on the Western Front (0 wins/2 nominations)
    • Best International Feature Film
    • Best Sound
  • Living (0 wins/1 nomination)
    • Best Actor
  • Till (0 wins/1 nomination)
    • Best Actress
  • Triangle of Sadness (0 wins/1 nomination)
    • Best Original Screenplay
  • Glass Onion: A Knives Out Mystery (0 wins/1 nomination)
    • Best Adapted Screenplay
  • White Noise (0 wins/1 nomination)
    • Best Adapted Screenplay
  • Empire of Light (0 wins/1 nomination)
    • Best Cinematography
  • The Woman King (0 wins/1 nomination)
    • Best Costume Design
  • RRR (0 wins/1 nomination)
    • Best Original Song
  • Tell It Like a Woman (0 wins/1 nomination)
    • Best Original Song
  • Turning Red (0 wins/2 nominations)
    • Best Animated Feature
  • My Father’s Dragon (0 wins/1 nomination)
    • Best Animated Feature
  • Strange World (0 wins/1 nomination)
    • Best Animated Feature
  • The Bad Guys (0 wins/1 nomination)
    • Best Animated Feature
  • Good Night Oppy (1 win/1 nomination)
    • Best Documentary Feature
  • Navalny (0 wins/1 nomination)
    • Best Documentary Feature
  • Fire of Love (0 wins/1 nomination)
    • Best Documentary Feature
  • All the Beauty and the Bloodshed (0 wins/1 nomination)
    • Best Documentary Feature
  • Descendant (0 wins/1 nomination)
    • Best Documentary Feature
  • Decision to Leave (1 win/1 nomination)
    • Best International Feature Film
  • Close (0 wins/1 nomination)
    • Best International Feature Film
  • Saint Omer (0 wins/1 nomination)
    • Best International Feature Film
Written by
Though Zoë Rose Bryant has only worked in film criticism for a little under three years - turning a collegiate passion into a full-time career by writing for outlets such as Next Best Picture and Awards Watch - her captivation with cinema has been a lifelong fascination, appreciating film in all its varying forms, from horror movies to heartfelt romantic comedies and everything in between. Born and raised in Omaha, Nebraska, she made the move to Los Angeles in 2021 after graduating college and now spends her days keeping tabs on all things pop culture and attempting to attend every screening under the sun. As a trans critic, she also seeks to champion underrepresented voices in the LGBTQ+ community in film criticism and offer original insight on how gender and sexuality are explored in modern entertainment. You can find Zoë on Twitter, Instagram, and Letterboxd at @ZoeRoseBryant.

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